Barrington Pastoral Charge consists of the appointments of Baccaro (Wesley), Barrington (Wesley), and Barrington Passage (St. James). All of these appointments are located in Shelburne County, Nova Scotia.

Barrington PC newsletter, Lent 1982

Barrington PC newsletter, Lent 1982

The first settlers in the area after the expulsion of the Acadians were from New England and were Congregationalists. Construction on a Congregationalist church building started in 1765 and was finished by 1767. These ranks were soon depleted by the formation of a Baptist congregation and a Methodist society in Barrington. Over the years there were four Methodist Circuits connected with Barrington Pastoral Charge: Barrington Circuit, North East Harbour Circuit, Port Latour Circuit and Shelburne Circuit. The Shelburne‑Barrington Circuit was formed in 1786.

Barrington Methodist Circuit Board of Stewards Accounts, 1796

Barrington Methodist Circuit Board of Stewards Accounts, 1796

Methodism in the Barrington area has its roots in Freeborn Garrettson, a former slave owner in Maryland who converted to Methodism and came to the Maritimes as a preacher. He came to Sheburne and Barrington in 1786 and formed the first Methodist class in the area. Garrettson returned to the United States in 1787 and his work was continued by James Mann and Rev. James Oliver Cromwell. A Methodist chapel was constructed in Barrington in 1816. The Methodist Sunday School began around 1827.

Shelburne and Barrington were linked together until 1833 when Barrington was made a separate circuit with Cape Negro and Port LaTour. Port LaTour became a separate circuit in 1870 and soon expanded to include Baccaro, Upper Port LaTour, Cape Negro, Port Clyde, and Blanche. A Methodist chapel was built at Lower Port LaTour in 1850. It is unknown when the first Methodist church was built in Upper Port LaTour.

As the membership of the Barrington Methodist Circuit began to increase in the 1850s, plans were made to construct a larger church building. A new building was constructed in 1866.

In 1870, the Barrington Circuit included the appointments of Barrington (also known as Barrington Head) and West (Barrington) Passage. By 1872, Bear Point was added to the Barrington Circuit, and Shag Harbour was added in 1873. A site for a Methodist Church at Shag Harbour was purchased in 1882 and a church building erected in 1885.

The North East Harbour Circuit was organized in 1863. The Circuit included the appointments of Black Point (later called Ingomar), Cape Negro, Carleton Village, McNutt’s Island, North East Harbour, and Roseway. The Church building at North East Harbour was destroyed by fire in 1907. A new church was erected in 1908.

A Methodist church was built in Barrington Passage in 1844 but was destroyed by fire in 1855. It was rebuilt in 1856.

The first meeting house in the Baccaro area was a Union house. A Methodist chapel was built in 1857 and was ready for worship in 1858.

Baccaro Methodist Church pew rental accounts, 1894

Baccaro Methodist Church pew rental accounts, 1894

In 1910, the Methodists at Carleton Village and McNutt’s Island united with the Presbyterians and were served by the Clyde River Presbyterian minister as part of the Clyde and Barrington Pastoral Charge. Port Latour became head of a separate Methodist circuit in 1870 and included the appointments of Baccaro, Blanche, Cape Negro, Port Clyde, and Upper Port Latour (listed in 1872 as Green Hill). (Port Latour was never a preaching place.)

At a joint meeting of the Presbyterian Presbytery of Lunenburg and Yarmouth and the Methodist Yarmouth District on 28 January 1923, it was recommended that the Presbyterians of Barrington Passage join with the Methodists and that they use the Presbyterian Church building for worship and that Carleton Village and McNutt’s Island be added to the North East Harbour Circuit. In 1924, the preaching points of the Barrington Circuit were Barrington Head, Barrington Passage, Bear Point (formerly Bare Point, a Union Church), and Shag Harbour. Seal Island was also visited annually.

In the early 1800’s the Barrington Presbyterian Congregation was part of a congregation (or Pastoral Charge) that covered the county from Cape Sable Island to Lockeport. The congregation was called the Shelburne, Clyde and Barrington Pastoral Charge. A Presbyterian Church was erected at Clyde River in 1839. In 1862, Clyde River and Barrington were separated from Shelburne and formed the Barrington and Clyde River Congregation which included the preaching points of Barrington, Cape Negro Island, Clyde River, and Ohio.

In 1910 the Methodists at Carleton Village and McNutt’s Island united with the Presbyterians and were served by the Clyde River Presbyterian minister as part of the Clyde and Barrington Pastoral Charge.

In 1925, all Methodist and Congregational Churches and a majority of Presbyterian Churches in Canada were formed into the United Church of Canada.

In 1925, the new Barrington Pastoral Charge of the United Church of Canada contained the appointments of Barrington, Barrington Passage, Bear Point and Shag Harbour. Clyde River was included in a separate pastoral charge, the Clyde River Pastoral Charge, which contained the appointments of Clyde River, Port Clyde, and Port Saxon. The North East Harbour Pastoral Charge of the Yarmouth Presbytery contained the appointments of Black Point (Ingomar), Cape Negro Island, Carleton Village, North East Harbour and Roseway. The Port Latour Pastoral Charge contained the appointments of Baccaro, Blanche, Cape Negro, and Upper Port Latour (Green Hill).

Baccaro continued as an appointment of the Port Latour Pastoral Charge until 1937 when it was placed with the Barrington Pastoral Charge. West Baccaro was added as a preaching point to Barrington Pastoral Charge in 1943 but was dropped in 1948.

In 1945, services were discontinued at Shag Harbour. The vacant Church was given to the Municipality of Barrington and demolished. Bear Point was closed in 1945 as well.

The Upper Port Latour (Green Hill United Church) church became part of Barrington Pastoral Charge in 1964. It was closed on December 31, 2004.

For a listing of Barrington Pastoral Charge records held at the Maritime Conference Archives, click on the following link:

Barrington Pastoral Charge Records Listing